A new season commences

After an 18 month break I return to teaching swimming poolside with Mid-Sussex Marlins Swimming Club. Most of the teachers will be familiar faces, though the kids will all be new … after a couple of years even the youngest are likely to have advanced through the ranks.

Here’s the programme for term. My intention is to write up the three sessions I take each week. This week is Front Crawl. I will take three 45 minute sessions, typically with three different age groups and grades.

TEACHING GROUP PROGRAMME 8th Sept- 31st Dec 2014

 

 

Date wk/beg

Stroke/Activity

Contrast Act

Notes

Mon 8th Sept

 

Front crawl Diving  
Mon15th Sept

 

Backstroke B/C Turns  
Mon 22nd Sept

 

Breaststroke BRS turns  
Mon 29th Sept

 

Butterfly BRS turns  
Mon 6th Oct

 

Starts & Turns   Preparation for Dev galas
Mon 13th Oct

 

Front crawl Diving Dev gala Tues 14th

Grades 1-4 Triangle

6.30-8.00pm

 

Dev gala Sat 18th

Grades 5-8 Triangle

8.30-10.45am

Mon 20th Oct

 

Breaststroke BRS turns  
Mon 27th Oct

 

Butterfly Fly Turns  
Mon 3rd Nov

 

Backstroke BC Turns  
Mon 10th Nov

 

Starts &Turns F/C & B/C   Competitive start Award Testing
Mon 17th Nov

 

Assessments/Front crawl F/C Turns All Assessments to be completed by this week
Mon 24th Nov

 

Breaststroke Sculling  
Mon 1st Dec

 

Backstroke Use of pace clock  
Mon 8th Dec

 

Starts & Turns BRS & Fly    
Mon 15th Dec

 

Relays/fun    
   

 

   
   

 

   

 

 

 

Marlins retain Swim21 acrediation for Teaching, Competitive Development and Masters Foundation

Go Marlins!

One of the only clubs in the county, and the only one in the ASA South East Region to hold THREE Swim21 national accreditations. These are for teaching, competitive development and Masters. One day we may even achieve ‘Performance’ accreditation, though to achieve this we need swimmers regularly in the top 10 nationally at an Olympic event.

Assesments – assignments and written exams for ASA Level 2 and Level 3 Coaching

Paper Assignments

I have in-front of me an Amateur Swimming Associations (ASA) paper for the Level III Senior Club Coach certificate. There are 12 sheets, facing side only. The paper is waxed, copyrighted and stamped with the ASA logo. Having attended a day long workshop on the topic, done some reading and from my own experience I complete these assignment and submit. It ought to be submitted as is; this is in part a test of authenticity. I have handwritten my responses. My habit and way of doing things is to have it in a word document, so I load the text and tables, complete the required questions/tasks, print off and submit both parts. Invariably I get a note about the typed up/printed off version being so much better … it takes skills that even I lack to write something in some of the minuscule boxes.

I was discussing on Monday with the ASA how to avoid plagiarism with e-assessments.

I mentioned Nottingham University medical students attening a computer-based assessment. I mentioned software that can spot plagiarism. I struggled however with the kind of forms the ASA uses as these tests seem to be have written with the EXAMINER in mind … i.e. to make them easy to mark. Which also makes it easy to cheat. The answer is the same, not open to interpretation. More or less. This isn’t strictly fair … papers are returned covered in red ink – I have redone one paper.

There has to be a sign in process that is used to identify a person.

How many people cheat? Is it such a problem?

Apparently so. Even with certificates and qualifications it appears easy to falsify documents. And often, these determined people are excellent teachers/coaches who have learn their trade as competitive swimmers and/or on the job, so they know what they are doing, they simply don’t have the piece of paper.

Memory Cards

I also have in front of me a set of handwritten cards given to me by a colleague who has just taken her Level II Coaching certificate. She failed the written paper. She used these cards to test herself. My intention is to put these into Spaced-Ed, as an exercise, possibly to create or to begin to create a useful learning tool.

I like the way Space-Ed prompts you over the week, tests you on a few things, then leaves you alone. You have time to assimilate the information. Is it easy learning? It is easier learning … nothing beats a period of concerted effort and self-testing to verify that you know something or not.

Whether electronic, or paper … or the spoken word, there is always a bridge to gap, a translation, as it were, of the information a person wants or needs to assimilate and this assimilation process.

Common to all is EFFORT.

Do you work hard at it for longer periods of time … or divide the task up into smaller chunks? Which works best? For you, or anyone? Is there a definitive answer? No. It will vary for you, as with anyone else. It will vary by motivation, inclination, time available, the nature and importance of the topic, the degree to which this topic is covered in print or online, or in workshops and in the workplace. In deed, my contention, would be that the greater the variety of ways to engage with the information the better it will be retained and the more useful it will be when required in a myriad of ways to be applied or is called upon.

On reflection

I learn from writing somethign out by hand. I learn again when I type it up. I may not be engaging with it ‘in the workpale;’ but there is engagement non the less through my eyes, hands and fingers. Similarly the person who wrote out this pack of 71 cards (both sides written up) was preparng themselves, afterall, for a written exam. She knows her stuff poolside, her struggle (as I know is the case for many) is translating this into exam-like responses in a highly false setting, away from a pool, from swimmers, having to read words to respond in text, rather than reading an athlete (observation) and responding with a fixing drill or exercise.